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Astonishing moment boy, four, is spotted from the air after surviving in the African wilderness

After six days of solitude, the young boy was finally found after a search party was deployed to find him.  It was spotted from the air by pilot Roan Carr-Hartley in the Kenyan wilderness

A 4-year-old boy managed to survive on his own for six days after getting lost in Kenyan bushland that was teeming with predators.

The young boy from the town of Asa miraculously emerged unscathed despite wandering more than 11 miles from his home and into the desert filled with jackals and hyenas.

The young boy had disappeared in a storm after a day spent herding cattle with his brothers on November 28. During the torrential weather, the boy became separated from his siblings and found himself lost in the Kenyan bush.

After six days of solitude, the young boy was finally found after a search party was deployed to find him. It was spotted from the air by pilot Roan Carr-Hartley who worked for the nearby Sheldrick Wildlife Trust.

After six days of solitude, the young boy was finally found after a search party was deployed to find him.  It was spotted from the air by pilot Roan Carr-Hartley in the Kenyan wilderness

After six days of solitude, the young boy was finally found after a search party was deployed to find him. It was spotted from the air by pilot Roan Carr-Hartley in the Kenyan wilderness

A search party of 70 men scoured the wild scrubland in search of the little boy.  They are photographed by pilot Roan Carr-Hartley from above

A search party of 70 men scoured the wild scrubland in search of the little boy. They are photographed by pilot Roan Carr-Hartley from above

Pilot Roan Carr-Hartley captured the miraculous moment the boy, who had been lost for six days, was reunited with the village search party

Pilot Roan Carr-Hartley captured the miraculous moment the boy, who had been lost for six days, was reunited with the village search party

The next day, when the boy had still not returned home, the boy’s Asa community leader phoned the Sheldrick Wildlife Trust to ask if he would help his 70-member search team find the boy for him. bring home safely.

The chief had heard from a nearby village that the Wildlife Trust had helped them find a lost child a few days earlier, using a plane to locate them from the air.

Pilot Roan Carr-Hartley, writing a blog post about the incident, said he went looking for the boy early the next morning.

“As I was in over my head,” he wrote, “a 70-man search party was scouring the wild scrubland for the little boy. I had a rough direction of the location of the search party given to me by the leader. The group had followed the boy to an area seven kilometers from his village, but the tracks then began to become unreadable.

For four hours, the pilot scanned the area without success, discovering only packs of hyenas and jackals.

Members of the search team run to the lost young boy in stunning footage taken by pilot Roan Carr-Hartley

Members of the search team run to the lost young boy in stunning footage taken by pilot Roan Carr-Hartley

Members of the search team embrace the young boy who had survived alone in the unforgiving wilderness filled with predators

Members of the search team embrace the young boy who had survived alone in the unforgiving wilderness filled with predators

“It was an unforgiving environment for anyone to be alone, let alone a child so young,” Carr-Hartley wrote.

The only consolation of the good news was that it had rained recently, which meant the boy would at least have access to water.

After a long stint in the air, the pilot returned to base to refuel, before flying again for another three and a half hours.

Carr-Hartley said: “It seemed hopeless to search for a little boy in such a vast expanse of wilderness. There have been times when I haven’t been able to locate a particular elephant for a week, let alone a four-year-old.

But although it had rained again that night, which meant the lost boy could find water, time had erased his tracks. The research team was losing hope.

Then, five days later, after the boy disappeared, the pilot received another call from the chief saying that they had found traces – 15 kilometers from his home.

“Hope had been rekindled and I was incredibly eager to keep looking,” Carr-Hartley wrote. “I kept thinking about the poor little lonely guy over there and wanted to do everything I could to find him – even if it seemed like an impossible mission.”

As soon as the sun rose the next day, Carr-Hartley was back in the air, determined to find the young boy, with the search party still on foot.

After an hour of looking for the young boy, “a miracle happened”.

Carr-Hartley recalled his relief: “From my left wing I saw a small figure below me, surrounded by a mass of shrubs and trees.”

“I couldn’t believe my eyes, but there he was: a little boy surrounded by endless wilderness. I was in shock that he was still alive and walking.

Understandably scared, the young boy first hid from the plane, finding shelter under bushes and trees. The hero pilot said the boy was ‘obviously hypoglycemic and stumbling while walking’.

Heroic pilot Roan Carr-Hartley is pictured with the search party after teaming up to bring the young boy home

Heroic pilot Roan Carr-Hartley is pictured with the search party after teaming up to bring the young boy home

The young boy is miraculously reunited with his family and members of his village, who rejoice at his return

The young boy is miraculously reunited with his family and members of his village, who rejoice at his return

He circled his plane tightly, trying to get the attention of the search party on foot with no other means of communicating with them.

To his relief, three members of the search party appeared, so Carr-Hartley reached out of his plane to point at the boy, taking pictures of the miraculous reunion.

“They finally reached the boy, who was still frozen in disbelief that his ordeal was over. Upon reaching him, they lifted him above their shoulders and began to cheer and sing. It was a sight that lifted me up nicely as I watched from above.

Carr-Hartley then returned to the boy’s village to join in the celebrations of his return.

“When I showed his mother the pictures of her boy, she burst into tears. She couldn’t believe he was still alive and was flooded with emotion.

The search party had brought the boy home, as is their custom, singing songs of thanks and blessings. Covered in mosquito bites and scratches from thorny bushes, the boy was given water and put on a slow drip while doctors watched him.

Carr-Hartley received a goat from the community elders and returned home.

A few days later, Car-Hartley received an update from the boy’s parents, telling him that the boy had recovered well. In honor of his heroic efforts, they had added “Roan” to the boy’s name and had been nicknamed “Pilot” by his friends.

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