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German WAG shows off her goosebumps as she joins fans complaining that Qatar stadiums are too COLD

Christina Ginter, who is married to German footballer Matthias Ginter, shivered in the stands as she watched her husband's side lose 2-1 to Japan in a shock defeat yesterday.

The Germans find another reason to be upset! WAG shows her goosebumps as she joins fans complaining that Qatar stadiums are too COLD after her husband’s 2-1 loss to Japan

A German WAG showed her goosebumps as she joined soccer fans in complaining that Qatar’s World Cup stadiums are too cold.

Christina Ginter, who is married to German footballer Matthias Ginter, shivered in the stands as she watched her husband’s side lose 2-1 to Japan in a shock defeat yesterday.

Christina shared her dismay on Instagram, posting a photo of the goosebumps on her arm while complaining that Qatar were going to extremes when cooling down their eight stadiums.

Christina, who has lived with the wives of other German players at the Hilton’s four-star Fuwairit Kite Beach hotel, appeared stern during the football match in which her husband sat on the substitutes’ bench.

Qatar, the first World Cup hosts to stage the tournament in a desert, hosting the first World Cup in a desert, has spent millions cooling the football stands with huge air conditioning funnels placed under the seats .

Christina Ginter, who is married to German footballer Matthias Ginter, shivered in the stands as she watched her husband's side lose 2-1 to Japan in a shock defeat yesterday.

Christina Ginter, who is married to German footballer Matthias Ginter, shivered in the stands as she watched her husband’s side lose 2-1 to Japan in a shock defeat yesterday.

Christina shared her dismay on Instagram, posting a photo of the goosebumps on her arm while complaining that Qatar were going to extremes when cooling down their eight stadiums

Christina shared her dismay on Instagram, posting a photo of the goosebumps on her arm while complaining that Qatar were going to extremes when cooling down their eight stadiums

Christina, who has lived with the wives of other German players at the Hilton's four-star Fuwairit Kite Beach hotel, appeared stern during the football match in which her husband sat on the substitutes' bench.  Pictured: Christina Ginter and German footballer Matthias Ginter

Christina, who has lived with the wives of other German players at the Hilton’s four-star Fuwairit Kite Beach hotel, appeared stern during the football match in which her husband sat on the substitutes’ bench. Pictured: Christina Ginter and German footballer Matthias Ginter

But fans said the hosts had gone too far, especially during evening matches when the desert temperature drops from 30°C (86°F) to around 19°C (66°F).

During England’s game against Iran on Monday, fans were seen pulling on their sweaters as the freezing air blew around the stadium.

Even a local Qatari fan, Faisal Rasheed, 40, had to wear a maroon sweatshirt during Qatar’s game against Ecuador. “Actually, it’s too cold,” he said.

The World Cup is taking place during the winter months instead of the traditional June-July window after organizers moved it in 2015, five years after Qatar was awarded hosting rights, due to the worries about how fans and players would fare in the scorching summer heat.

Qatar has spent millions cooling football stands with huge air conditioning funnels placed under the seats

Qatar has spent millions cooling football stands with huge air conditioning funnels placed under the seats

A family at the Khalifa International Stadium seen wearing jumpers over large air vents during England's game against Iran on Monday

A family at the Khalifa International Stadium seen wearing jumpers over large air vents during England’s game against Iran on Monday

Qatar has spent billions to build seven outdoor air-conditioned World Cup stadiums.

Organizers trumpeted the technology behind the cooling systems in the long lead up to the tournament, repeatedly claiming that temperatures in the stands and playing field would hover around 20°C (68°F), regardless of be the external conditions.

Doha’s 974 Stadium is the only venue that will not be cooled, but it will only host night matches.

The Bedouin tent-shaped Al Bayt Stadium has a cooling station that sends chilled water to several air-handling units inside the venue. Some of the water used in the cooling process is recycled wastewater, said stadium engineer Saud Ghani.

Mario Sanchez, a 33-year-old American fan, said he traveled to Qatar from Chicago to watch 28 of the tournament’s 64 matches.

“It’s actually a bit cold,” Sanchez said, “but that’s because it’s really windy.”

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